Canadians want fair elections

No party should win a majority of seats without a majority of votes.

But that’s exactly what has happened in one third of Canada’s federal elections.

Campaigning before Canada’s election, Justin Trudeau committed to change that.

“We are committed to ensuring that 2015 will be the last federal election conducted under the first-past-the-post voting system.” – Justin Trudeau (August 2015)

Canadians believe he should keep that promise.

A year-long Canada-wide consultation that included a ministerial tour, expert testimony at cross-Canada parliamentary committee meetings, town halls held in every province, and a household survey of 360,000 Canadians all point to a decisive preference: Canadians want to replace our broken and outdated electoral system with proportional representation.

It’s time for the Prime Minister to keep his promise and table legislation to make every vote count with proportional representation.

Sign the largest ever House of Commons online petition on electoral reform here.

The history

Canadians have been promised fair elections since 1919, when William Lyon Mackenzie King first committed to proportional representation.

One third of all federal elections in Canada have resulted in false majorities, where a party won a majority of seats without a majority of the votes. Some contemporary examples:

  • Pierre Elliot Trudeau won three consecutive false majorities in 1968, 1974, and 1980.
  • Brian Mulroney won a false majority in 1998.
  • Jean Chrétien won three consecutive false majorities in 1993, 1997, and 2000.
  • Stephen Harper won a false majority in 2011. With 39 percent of the popular vote, he held 54 percent of the seats in Parliament.
  • Justin Trudeau won a false majority in 2015. With 39 percent of the popular vote, he holds 54 percent of the seats in Parliament.

Choose PR