Just Transition Task Force report has potential to put people at the heart of climate policy

March 11, 2019

Canada’s unions welcome the federal government’s release of the final report of the Just Transition Task Force for Canadian Coal Power Workers and Communities, along with the accompanying report: “What We Heard from Canadian Coal Power Workers and Communities”.

“The Task Force worked to put people and communities at the heart of climate policy by developing ten practical and concrete recommendations on how to support affected workers and communities through the transition away from coal-fired electricity, with worker involvement and local decision making at the centre,” said Hassan Yussuff, President of the Canadian Labour Congress.

Co-chaired by Yussuff, the Task Force’s mandate was to provide the federal government with recommendations for how to support a just and fair transition for Canadian coal workers and communities, as Canada meets its commitment to transition away from coal-powered electricity by 2030. It has been working since April 2018 and included strong representation from labour, as well as a former employer in the coal-power sector, a councillor from an affected municipality, and experts in workforce transitions and sustainable development.

“I want to thank the workers and community members who met with the Task Force. Learning about their jobs and their communities and hear directly about what they need to make this transition away from coal-fired power a just transition was key to crafting these recommendations,” said Yussuff.

The task force met with workers and federal, provincial and municipal governments and other stakeholders in communities with coal power facilities across the four affected provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

“It has been an honour to serve as a co-chair for this task force and look forward to working with the government to ensure meaningful action on implementing these much needed recommendations,” said Yussuff. “Canada’s unions will be watching next week’s federal budget for signs that the government will support workers and their communities as Canada works to address climate change.”

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